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Sana’a (AM) – The double standards strategy is a well-known feature of the United States’ policy, both internal and external. Washington raises the slogans of democracy and freedom but in actual practice is completely contrary to those slogans. Slogans are used only to control other states. Where democracy conforms to the strategic and economic interests of the United States, it favors and stands by its side. When democracy is in conflict with its interests, its value becomes less, neglected and disregarded.

This is evident if we consider US policy in both Yemen and Venezuela. It deals with the two countries in the name of democracy with a contradiction that exposes Washington and reveals its ugly face as it unfolds day after day. It also reveals its false democracy and the fact that it does not stand by the will of the people and does not support human rights.

In Yemen, the US gathered the oil kingdoms and mercenary countries in a coalition of more than 15 countries and launched a war that left about 40,000 killed, according to government statistics. Hundreds of thousands of women and children were displaced and some 3 million people were driven out of their homes. Houses, schools, hospitals, mosques, and factories were destroyed. Roads, bridges, water systems, electricity, and communications networks were targeted. All ports and airports are under siege.


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The war destroyed all the components of life in Yemen so that nearly 22 million of the population become in need of urgent humanitarian assistance. Famine spread until the situation reached the death of a Yemeni child every ten minutes, as reported by the UNICEF. All that was, as it claims, to restore a Riyadh-aligned regime that had resigned and fled the country. Ansarullah and their allies — who have since been running state affairs — have been defending the country against the US-Saudi aggression.

While in Caracas, the US has staunchly backed Venezuela’s “interim president” Juan Guaido, who declared himself president on January 23. after President Nicolas Maduro was sworn in for a second term in January after winning an election boycotted by the opposition. US President Donald Trump was quick to officially recognize Guaidó as the president, announcing sanctions on Venezuela’s oil industry to pressure Maduro.

Washington has threatened to use military force in the country, with US officials saying “all options are on the table” against Caracas. Maduro maintains that Trump is using Venezuela’s humanitarian crisis as a cover-up for his military plans in the country.

This post originally ran on al-Masirah and was republished here with permission.

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