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Moscow (GPA) – Despite the recent splits between the Muslim Brotherhood and their traditional Sunni allies, history shows us there is another direction Egyptians can go.

This article is a compilation of quotations about relations between the Islamic Republic of Iran and the Egyptian Muslim Brotherhood, between Shia and Sunni scholars and thinkers from Crescent International. The purpose aim of the article is not to forget the glorious past of the Islamic Union and continue to work in this direction.

1951 – “This letter was sent by Martyr Sayyid Qutb, the Egyptian writer of renown, to Ayatollah Kashani of Iran as a confirmation of the emerging unity of the Muslim Ummah. It was published by the journal al-Risalah (No. 951, Dhu al-Hijjah 24, 1370/September 25, 1951)”

1992 “It is difficult to measure Qutb’s direct influence on the Islamic Revolution, but the Islamic government in Iran has acknowledged its debt to him by issuing commemorative stamps.”

1999 – “Sayyid Qutb lives in the hearts of millions of Muslims worldwide. His books have been translated into virtually every language that Muslims read, and remain hugely influential. The main translations into Farsi have been done by the Rahbar of the Islamic Republic, Ayatullah Seyyed Ali Khamenei, himself. This is a great tribute to the martyred scholar of Islam.”

2000  – “In Iran, the late forties and early fifties saw the activity of Ayatullah Abu ‘l-Qasim Kashani, the most politically engaged ‘alim of the period; like his counterparts elsewhere in the Muslim world, he, too, frequently evoked the theme of social justice in the numerous declarations he delivered. Temporarily allied with Kashani was the organization known as the Fida’iyan-i Islam, members of which had both personal and ideological links to the Brethren.”

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2013 – “Imam Hasan al-Banna met with Ayatullah Kashani during the Hajj of 1948ce. Both agreed to convene a grand conference that would close ranks and endear Sunnis and Shi‘is to each other.”

2014 – “One of the members of the Ikhwani delegation that visited the late blessed Imam Khomeini upon his triumphant return to Iran was a Saudi, Abdullah Suleiman al-‘Aqeel.”

Additionally, in the words of Martyr Dr. Fathi Shaqaqi: “The martyred Imam Hasan al-Banna, who was one of the pioneers of the modern Islamic movement, had revived the thought of bringing the Sunnis and Shi’ites together. He was one of the leading participants in the works of Jami’at at-Taqrib Bain Al-Mathahib Al-Islamiyah (The League to Bring Together Islamic Schools of Thought). This was believed by some to be impossible to achieve but al-Banna and other Islamic scholars and leaders believed it possible and very near being achieved. They agreed that Muslims should come together on the basic beliefs and principles which are accepted by all of them and that they should accept each other’s opinions on matters which neither constitute a condition for the faith nor a pillar of the religion, nor amount to denying what is known to be one of the necessities of the religion.”

“It is well known that Imam al-Banna met the Shi’ite Imam, Ayatullah Kashani, during his pilgrimage in 1948 and an understanding occurred between them. This was referred to by one of today’s distinguished personalities of the Ikhwan al-Muslimun and a student of the martyred Imam al-Banna. that is, ‘Abd al-Muta’al al-Jabri, who says in his book, Limatha yuqitla Hasan (Why Hasan al-Banna was Assassinated),5 quoting Robert Jackson’s words. “If the life of this man (al-Bannal had been longer, it would have been possible to gain many benefits for this land, especially in the agreement between al-Banna and Ayatullah Kashani, one of the Iranian Muslim leaders, to uproot the discord between the Sunnis and Shi’ites. They met each other in the Hijaz in 1948. It appears that they conferred with each other and reached a basic understanding but Hasan al-Banna was quickly assassinated.”6 Mr. Jabri comments on this saying, “Jackson is right and realized by his political common sense the efforts of Imam al-Banna in bringing together various Islamic schools of thought.”

“One of the Ikhwan al-Muslimun’s thinkers, Salim al-Bahnasawi, says in Al-Sunna Al-Muftara alaiha (The Tradition Being Falsified)3, “Since the formation of the group of bringing together Islamic schools of thought in which Imam al-Banna and Imam al-Qummi clearly participated, cooperation existed between the Ikhwan al-Muslimun and the Shi’ites that led to the visit of Nawab Safawi to Cairo in 1954. ” He also says on the same page, “This kind of cooperation is not surprising or strange because the beliefs. of both groups (the Sunnis and the Shi’ites) lead to it.”

“It is well known that Imam al-Banna met the Shi’ite Imam, Ayatullah Kashani, during his pilgrimage in 1948 and an understanding occurred between them. This was referred to by one of today’s distinguished personalities of the Ikhwan al-Muslimun and a student of the martyred Imam al-Banna. that is, ‘Abd al-Muta’al al-Jabri, who says in his book, Limatha yuqitla Hasan (Why Hasan al-Banna was Assassinated), quoting Robert Jackson’s words. “If the life of this man (al-Bannal had been longer, it would have been possible to gain many benefits for this land, especially in the agreement between al-Banna and Ayatullah Kashani, one of the Iranian Muslim leaders, to uproot the discord between the Sunnis and Shi’ites. They met each other in the Hijaz in 1948. It appears that they conferred with each other and reached a basic understanding but Hasan al-Banna was quickly assassinated.” Mr. Jabri comments on this saying, “Jackson is right and realized by his political common sense the efforts of Imam al-Banna in bringing together various Islamic schools of thought.”

This post was submitted by a Geopolitics Alert Contributor and may not reflect the positions of the editorial staff.

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